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Japanese Knives

Started by That Sharpening Guy, July 12, 2014, 04:40:35 PM

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That Sharpening Guy

Are we able to sharpen Japanese knives both single bevel and double bevel on the Tormek and if so how. I don't know if I will ever come across any but if I do I don't want to be buying one unless it is for myself not as a replacement.

If you know of any videos showing a Japanese knife being sharpened on the Tormek I would appreciate the link

Thanks!!!

Herman Trivilino

You would sharpen a Japanese knife basically the same way as a Western knife.

Here's a discussion of the issue: http://forum.tormek.com/index.php?topic=236.0

   
Origin: Big Bang

SharpenADullWitt

Several of the videos I have seen, say sushi chefs like to go to a much higher grit then the base Tormek stone.  (specifically sushi chefs)
Since the Japanese chef I know isn't in town (works in Omaha), I am wondering if you, Herman think the SJ stone might be better for SOME things, or if it is more just a personal preference?

Thanks
Favorite line, from a post here:
Quote from: Rob on February 24, 2013, 06:11:44 PM
8)

Yeah you know Tormek have reached sharpening nirvana when you get a prosthetic hand as part of the standard package :/)

Herman Trivilino

I've never used the Japanese Waterstone but from what I've been told it would probably be too fine to sharpen a really dull blade.

The Original Grindstone graded fine followed by the leather honing wheel should do it, but you could use the Japanese Waterstone with success as long as you kept the knife sharp.

The sushi chef I know says he sharpens his knife every night by hand.  He doesn't wait for it to get dull.

Origin: Big Bang

SharpenADullWitt

Quote from: Herman Trivilino on July 13, 2014, 08:50:58 AM

The sushi chef I know says he sharpens his knife every night by hand.  He doesn't wait for it to get dull.

That is along the lines of what I was thinking.  Using the SJ stone more as a maintainer.

On another note, the last of my "needed" Tormek stuff arrived yesterday.  (Turner setting tool and video)  Prior owner didn't have those, or know where they went.  Good thing too, because I picked up an old 1940 lathe at a garage/pre estate sale.
Favorite line, from a post here:
Quote from: Rob on February 24, 2013, 06:11:44 PM
8)

Yeah you know Tormek have reached sharpening nirvana when you get a prosthetic hand as part of the standard package :/)

Ken S

"The sushi chef I know says he sharpens his knife every night by hand.  He doesn't wait for it to get dull."

I think Herman's friend, the sushi chef, got it right.  Frequent regular sharpeining makes the job easier, and the cutting is always done with a sharp knife.

Would the same principle apply to other tools? :)

Ken

Herman Trivilino

Quote from: Ken S on July 13, 2014, 10:57:30 PM
Would the same principle apply to other tools? :)

Most definitely.  In a perfect world.  When I worked as a carpenter it was the opposite of a perfect world when it came to sharpening.  The only thing I ever saw sharpened with success were the 7.25-inch circular saw blades we used in our power saws.  Not the carbide tipped ones.  My friend showed me how to do it with a file while holding the blade between the knees.  We didn't have a vise.
Origin: Big Bang

Rob

slightly off topic I accept but you've reminded me....anyone have a known to work technique of sharpening bandsaw blades?
Best.    Rob.

Ken S

Rob, I'm sure this is not the answer you have ben hoping to read:  Hand files a tooth at a time.  My standard blade is a 1/2" 3 tpi blade.  This is obviously less work than a finer toothed blade.  I have not actually sharpened my blade, however, I have seen it done at a workshop.

Ken

Herman Trivilino

Quote from: Rob on July 14, 2014, 01:17:48 AM
slightly off topic I accept but you've reminded me....anyone have a known to work technique of sharpening bandsaw blades?

If you buy a new one it'll be sharp.   ;D
Origin: Big Bang

Rob

Quote from: Ken S on July 14, 2014, 01:57:14 AM
Rob, I'm sure this is not the answer you have ben hoping to read:  Hand files a tooth at a time.  My standard blade is a 1/2" 3 tpi blade.  This is obviously less work than a finer toothed blade.  I have not actually sharpened my blade, however, I have seen it done at a workshop.

Ken

Yup...I've seen that method used too.  I also tend to centre on 1/2" 3 tpi because that's ideal for cutting up green wood blanks.  But I have a 16" throat bandsaw and even at 3 tpi that's a lot of teeth!  I'm hoping to find a non too costly solution that speeds things up a bit.
Best.    Rob.

grepper

#11
Looks like you could get good at this and do about 1 tooth/second or so
http://www.woodturningvideosplus.com/resharpen-bandsaw-blades.html

Or if you are not too much of a perfectionist I suppose this might work:
http://woodgears.ca/bandsaw/sharpening.html

Also:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UygEQ-079Ws

Or, for $1,200:
http://www.logosol.ca/toolbox/automatic-band-grinder/

Ken S

Rob, I really don't enjoy posting things I know you won't like.  However:

You are a computer/business guy. Calculate what you value for an hour of your productive time.  I would guess hand filing a bandsaw of your size (my 14" throat with riser is around 104") might take about half an hour.  This may or may not be a reasonable guess. What is the cost of  good quality blade?

Also factor in the satisfaction you would gain from restoring your bandsaw blade.  That's important.  Weigh that against the satisfaction you would gain from spending the same time turning. That's also important.

I still like the idea of using a (sharp) hand file.  Once you get a good rhythm going in very good light at a comfortable working height, I think you might be surprised with how quickly the operation goes. Find a good recording of Bach's Goldberg Variations.  You will be through before the harpsichordist.

A good reserve plan is to make sure you always have a couple new blades on hand.  This will allow you to sharpen the blades when it is convenient, not when it is necessary to continue  a project.

A couple strokes per tooth, and soon the job is done.

Ken

Rob

I've got several spare new blades for just that reason.  What file would you recommend then Ken because I really am a little light in that department but I'm happy to give it a go.....just cos its you :-)

Half an hour mind....that's the limit :-)  Can I listen to Vivaldi's Four Seasons?
Best.    Rob.

Ken S

Rob, I checked my library.  Lie-Nielsen says it may be possible to sharpen impulse hardened bandsaw blades with a diamond file or a carbide burr in a Dremel tool, but he recommends against it. Older carbon steel blades can be sharpened with a small round file.

As much as it goes against my Yankee thrift, it's probably better just to put a new blade in. (In truth, I would probably keep some old not quite sharp blades for rough work.)

Ken

ps The Goldberg harpsichordist will still be cranking out the tunes when the Vivaldi crowd has left the hall for the local pub.