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Messages - tgbto

#1
Quote from: cbwx34 on June 13, 2024, 11:40:43 PMIf you'll notice prior to locking the legs down you can rock the USB back and forth (not much but a little bit.)  If you push down on over the Micro Adjust leg and then secure it, you can rock (tilt) the USB up slightly with a bit of pressure.  But if you lock it down while pushing on the other leg, it can't move anymore. 


Strange. I just tried : push down on the USB on the MA leg, tighten the MA leg, tighten the non-MA leg, release downwards pressure on the MA leg. The USB cannot move *at all*. Or at least that I can measure...

#2
Quote from: cbwx34 on June 12, 2024, 07:44:49 PM
Quote from: tgbto on June 12, 2024, 05:18:03 PM...
- wrong tightening technique for USB legs (one should press down on the leg with the MicroAdjust, tighten, then tighten the other one)

I'm glad you brought this up.  I know this is what Tormek recommends, but I now do the opposite, I push down on the other leg first.  The reason is I found that, for example, the Truing Tool which pushes up against the USB... if I push down on the MicroAdjust side first, the TT can push up and cause the USB to tip (enough that I can turn the MicroAdjust almost .5mm).  But, if I push down on the opposite side first, it's locked in place and won't move.  Obviously, I could tighten things down enough so that it doesn't matter (and of course light passes), just one more thing I don't have to think about.

Probably doesn't make a difference in reality (but if someone is measuring to 0.0015", it might.)

What'd ya think?

I'm not sure I follow you there. You mean if you tighten the leg with the MA then the leg without it, the TT can afterwards push up the USB legs ? I have not noticed this. I would rather be afraid of the USB being no longer parallel with the wheel shaft as there is no planar reference on the leg without the USB... I'll have to look into that.

Quote from: Segovia123 on June 13, 2024, 03:50:26 PMI managed to get the wheel true and remove th 0.0015" gap, but having problem with getting a square edge on my 2 1/4" plane blade

If you wheel is true and parallel to the USB, it is now a matter of setting up your tool and blade properly. I'll be assuming you're using the SE-77 jig.

The blade can be out-of-square with the jig. It is unlikely that you'd set it up improperly against the near-side stops of the jig.

There are however two knobs on the SE-77 that are here to allow for camber as well as correcting for a non-straight angle. As per the manual, the two lines should be aligned for the jig to be in the neutral position, and both adjustment screws tightened. Loosening one and tightening the other allows for a slight skew, loosening both allow for a camber.

So you could check that after aligning both lines and tightening both screws, your blade is square to the jig. If it is, and the wheel is true and square, the last thing I can think of is technique, where you'd be applying uneven pressure on both sides of the blade.
#3
Yup, as mentioned in several other posts, the "aligning against the side" tip works only if the USB is square to the side of the wheel. That has to be checked first.

It is square (within my measurements tolerances at least) on both of my T8s. The main reasons I can see for that not being the case are :
- bent USB
- wrong tightening technique for USB legs (one should press down on the leg with the MicroAdjust, tighten, then tighten the other one)
#4
Nice !

Maybe with a "spaceship-type" contraption, we could do controlled honing on such a wheel.
#5
Quote from: AlInAussieLand on June 06, 2024, 08:36:38 PMThis knife would micro chip, no matter what method or stone used.
With the T8 I finally got the micro chips out and back to a factory edge, while at the same time causing a hollow grind in the middle section.....grrhh. 
Lots more practise needed.....



For the carving knife, the steel might be quite brittle and will hate the kind of lateral impact with a hard stone it gets with the edge pro. The T8 edge leading, along with the finely controlled way you lay down the jig, will minimize this phenomenon.

As for the hollow grind, it is a very common problem at first. The most useful advice I could find so far are :
- Put a bit more pressure when the heel is on the stone to compensate for the fact that it will see less stone time overall compared to the middle section (in a video by Wootz)
- Round the shoulders of the stone significantly. Else when you lay down your knife, if it is ever so slightly tilted towards the tip, it will severely overgrind the middle portion.
- As you said, practice, practice, practice.
#6
Knife Sharpening / Re: ceramic knives with the S G
June 07, 2024, 09:33:28 AM
[Damn I messed up with the edits/post buttons]

Quote from: cbwx34 on June 06, 2024, 06:45:45 PMI sharpened the same knife this a.m. on a SB stone (edge leading)... and while I didn't spend a lot of time on it, I'm pretty sure I got a better edge... at least slicing thru some ad paper.

I don't know much about the physical properties of SG and SB. But I haven't yet had to true the SB, and in its current state I would say the surface is more even than the surface of my (several-times-trued) SG. Ie the RMS height of the indentations is smaller. So you are using a harder, smoother medium than the SG, and it is logical that the blade would chip less. If you are abrading rather than microchipping on a smaller scale remains to be seen, and will depend on the relative hardness of this ceramic and silicon carbide.
#7
Knife Sharpening / Re: ceramic knives with the S G
June 07, 2024, 09:28:17 AM
Quote from: cbwx34 on June 06, 2024, 06:45:45 PMI sharpened the same knife this a.m. on a SB stone (edge leading)... and while I didn't spend a lot of time on it, I'm pretty sure I got a better edge... at least slicing thru some ad paper.

I don't know much about the physical properties of SG and SB. But I haven't yet had to true the SB, and in its current state I would say the surface is more even than the surface of my (several-times-trued) SG. Ie the RMS of the indentations is smaller. So you are using a harder, smoother medium than the SG, and it is logical that the blade would chip less. If you are abrading rather than microchipping on a smaller scale remains to be seen, and will depend on the relative hardness of this ceramic and silicon carbide.
#8
That's a fair point, but remember you need to compare apples to apples. You should compare the time it takes to sharpen with the T-8 with the time required to get the same finish on an edgepro. If you want to compare based on the Edge pro with glass stones and polish tapes (and I would add leather strop to really deburr cleanly) you should compare it to the Wootz version of the T-8, with the addition of the japanese stone and 3 different stropping compounds.

Two remarks AFAIAC :
- The difference between a T8 and edge pro is bigger as the blade gets longer.
- The mirror polish hair splitting finish you get when finely polishing the blade does not translate in kitchen-world edge retention and perceived cutting performance. A SG with honing on leather wheel is sufficient for most applications, as is the Edge Pro with the 600 stone and leather strop.
#9
Knife Sharpening / Re: ceramic knives with the S G
June 06, 2024, 04:11:46 PM
TL/DR : it's normal, and don't try sharpening your expensive knife with a SG even graded fine.

Don't know if that's what you mean, but those are two very different fracturation modes : tensile stress and compressive stress (hopefully those are the english terms, and to be precise there is also the notion of shearing). A given material can be fairly resistant to one and not the other.

If that given ceramic (or cement or whatever that knife is actually made of) exhibits the same kind of behavior as - say - concrete, it will be quite resistant to compressive stress (so you can stomp on it or try to crush it). But it will not resist to tensile stress, so you can't pull on it or bend it without breaking it. If you sharpen edge-leading, you will be more in  the compressive domain, if you sharpen edge-trailing you will be more in the tensile domain. 

The wheel substrate doesn't need to be too hard to chip the blade, it just need to be able to transfer energy to the blade. You can break a diamond chip with a screwdriver, or your precious ceramic knife on the edge of a hard plastic cutting board, if you hit sideways hard enough.

Steel usually has a very different behavior (and sharpening steel is an abrasion phenomenon, not a fracturation phenomenon). Brittle steel can be susceptible to chipping, as many of us know, but sharpening brittle steel still isn't the same as microchipping it.

The behavior experienced by @cbwx is consistent with a material that is less resistant to tension as it is to compression, but this is still a fracturation phenomenon. The chips we see, even though smaller in the edge-leading case, are still evidence of fracturation. You're doing something more akin to making a knife out of silex (the stoneage way) than out of steel. I would not call that sharpening unless done with a very hard, very fine (diamond ?) substrate, that will abrade the material instead of chipping it however microscopically. A rough, hard substrate may lead to fracturation instead of abrasion. That can be computed given the rotation speed of the wheel, applied pressure, angle, maximum particle size and a few physical constants describing the blade material.

#10
One of the most valuable pieces of advice I found in Tormek's videos was about how to avoid overgrinding the middle by thoroughly roundoing out the shoulders of the stone.
#11
Tormek support continues to hold up to their top-notch reputation.
#12
Knife Sharpening / Re: New angle jig KS-123
June 03, 2024, 03:30:19 PM
Quote from: cbwx34 on June 03, 2024, 03:18:52 PMThere's no difference in using the KJ vs the SVM jig to set up the KS-123.

BTW, for a bit of trivia, the KS handles a Projection Distance of 122-158 mm.

I understand that ^^

I might not have been clear enough : I was thinking of how when you set the whole thingamajig up with a given protrusion distance, and you want to use the adjustability of the SVM to setup another knife for the same sharpening angle. Ie not adjust the jig to the second knife then adjust USB, but rather use the SVM handle to adjust the protrusion distance to match that of the first knife without touching the USB. Does it make sense ?
#13
Knife Sharpening / Re: New angle jig KS-123
June 03, 2024, 02:48:47 PM
For those who have experience with this jig : how easy is it to replicate a protrusion distance with it along with a SVM jig ? Simple enough or is it easier to take a separate measurement using the wood-block method ?

Thanks !
#14
Quote from: Herman Trivilino on June 02, 2024, 10:09:39 AMGet some mouse traps, too. Or at least some rat poison if you don't have pets.  :)


And maybe, use the remnants of your T-8 switch cover as bait ?
#15
Tormek T-1 and T-2 / Re: T1 Help needed
June 03, 2024, 09:04:50 AM
Quote from: cbwx34 on May 31, 2024, 02:26:08 PMIf you're removing a lot of metal, you may want to occasionally switch sides prior to raising a burr... just to make sure you don't over-sharpen one side and inadvertently move the edge off center.  But what you posted will work.


Theoretically, when thinning a knife, the risk of running into such an issue is low, unlike when putting a primary bevel. But it's a good idea to get used to switching sides as part of the basic process as advised by @cbwx34.

You may also want to manage the speed with which you push/pull the knife : the way I've seen it demonstrated, you sharpen the knife going back and forth with a T-1. So you risk spending more time grinding the middle portion of the edge rather than heel/tip, and might raise a high spot especially during heavy grinding sessions. You can check it against a flat reference surface with a light in the background : make sure no light shines through where the flat of the blade meets the flat surface. If you start raising a burr in the middle portion while still having quite a lot of sharpie in the tip/heel area is also a good indication that you're overgrinding the middle.

And a quick remark about the T-1 user manual : the pictures for honing obviously show the knife in an awkward position when the handle of the knife is in the left hand. As demoed by Sebastian in the tormek T-1 video, you should keep the edge of the blade in contact with the whole width of the honing wheel, so the left hand honing position is not a mirror image of the right hand honing position. I guess too quick a cut and paste is to blame.