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Long knives & cleavers jig

Started by Jan, October 13, 2015, 04:25:52 PM

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WolfY

Quote from: Ken S on January 07, 2016, 03:16:12 AM
Seeing this makes me regret not having purchased a Tormek OWC-1 adaptor when I was at Hartville Hardware a week ago. Two holes drilled, some 14mm threaded rod and four bolts, combined with my BGM-100 kit would have made a fine cleaver holder.

Ken
Exactly what I had in mind Ken.  ;)
Giving an advice is easy.
Accepting an advice is good.
Knowing which advice is worth adopting and which not, is a virtue.

Ken S

I have  brilliant hindsight. :)

Ken

Edwe

What!!

I have totaly missed this jig, I love it, thankx wootz and Jan  :)
Now I just have to figure out the parts to use and find the time.

I have getting better with honing though, my first objekt were dulled

Jan

#18
You are welcome, Edwe!  :)

When honing long knives, it is recommendable to dismount the grinding wheel. Instead of the grinding wheel put on the shaft a spacer about 45 mm thick for T7 and 35 mm thick for T4.

I use the double ended kenjig to set the position of the universal support for honing. It is easy and quick and guarantees the same bevel angle for honing and sharpening. Some people are honing freehand and unintentionally somewhat dull a nicely sharpened knife bevel.

Jan

Ken S

Jan,

The spacer which originally shipped with the  Tormek serves that purpose. Knowing how easily lost it is, I made several spares from an odd short piece of plastic water pipe. Plastic conduit woeks well, also. These spacers are also necessary when transporting a Tormek. The grinding wheel should be removed.

Ken

Edwe

Jan & Ken, could you pls post a picture of what you mean ;)

Jan

Yes, you are correct, Ken! After your notice, I found the original spacer in the Tormek box.  :)

It was made of so very thin-walled plastic tube, that it was deformed by the pressure of the EasyLock nut and so it I did not pay attention to it. I made robust hardwood spacer and the original one I will keep for transportation purposes.

Jan

Jan

Edwe, here you can see the original spacer (white) and my robust wooden spacer (brown) on the shaft.



Jan

Edwe

Sorry Jan

The picture could not be seen, at least for me

Jan

Here is the same image stored in another repository.



Jan

Ken S

Jan

Your solution is certainly  more elegant and durable. I think the Tormek spacer is really only designed for shipping, which it does quite adequately.

Good photographs certainly help with explaining things. Well done, Jan.

Ken

Jan

Thank you Ken. It is only a chunk of oak roller bought as firewood.  :)

Jan

Ken S

You saw the angel in the piece of marble, Jan.

Ken

RickKrung

Quote from: Jan on October 14, 2015, 12:52:00 PM
Thank you, Sheang, you are welcome!  :)
Sorry for prioritizing users of the imperial system. My apology goes especially to you in France, which was the cradle of the Système International d'Unités.

The material table in metric system is following:
1.    Hollow steel profile 35 x 55 x 162 mm, mat. thickness 2 mm
2.   Two threated rods M12 x 165 mm
3.   Four nuts M12 with washers
4.   One low nut M12 as a micro adjust
5.   Base for universal support and four screws M5 x 16 mm with washers (BGM – 100)

Ad 1) I used steel profile, which I got for free at a local hardware store. Don't search after the same profile cross-section, it is not important.
I cut the maximum length (162 mm), which fits with the T7 housing. My intention was to have enough place for future optional mounting of the universal support base closer to the grinding wheel.

Ad 2) This length of the threated rods will enable to sharpen 10 cm (4") wide cleavers. This is enough for the largest Chinese choppers I sharpened.

Jan

Jan's post included dimensions of the stock used and fasteners, but did not include dimensions of the holes, probably for good reason.  He can't know the spacing of the 12 mm USB mount holes of other's machines, or the spacing of the holes on the Horizontal Base adapter (XB-100 for the T-7).  I took to my calipers and measured the sizes of the holes of all, and measured the distances between the holes, both the outer dimension as well as the inside dimension of the distance between sets of holes. 

Interestingly, I found the USB holes on the machine case to be different (I have a T-8).  The ones closest to the grinding wheel were fairly consistent, 0.477" (12.12mm).  But the USB holes away from the grinding wheel were larger, closer to 0.5" (12.5mm) and much less consistent. (These were measured using a machinist telescoping gage, so it is as precise as I can get without resorting to gage pins, which I have.)

Then, adding or subtracting respective hole radii to distances between outer edges or inner edges of the holes, I came up with an approximation of the distance between the CENTERS of the USB holes: 3.5375" which equals 89.9mm.  So, my guess is that Tormek uses a center distance of 90mm, which equals 3.543"  That is what I'll use for drilling the USB support holes in the 1" x 2" x 1/8" thick rectangular steel tube that I"ll use for mounting the XB-100 (T-7) Horizontal Base. 

Using similar procedures measuring the 5 mm hole spacings on the XB-100, I came up with 59mm (2.323") for the wide side spacing and 36mm (1.417") for the narrow hole spacing.

Your miles (KM):) may vary.  Verify all dimensions on what you have and are using.

Rick
Quality is like buying oats.  If you want nice, clean, fresh oats, you must pay a fair price. However, if you can be satisfied with oats that have already been through the horse, that comes at a lower price.

Jan

Rick, your interest pleases me!  :)
It is an inexpensive and very versatile adaptor.

Jan