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a new angle setting tool

Started by Ken S, October 19, 2015, 08:12:09 PM

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RichColvin

---------------------------
Rich Colvin
www.SharpeningHandbook.info - a reference guide for sharpening

You are born weak & frail, and you die weak & frail.  What you do between those is up to you.

RickKrung

Rich,

I used 1/4"x5/8" stainless bearings, purchased from McMaster-Carr.  The URL only takes you to the page, not the specific item.  Here are the specs from that page:

R4   1/4"   5/8"   0.196"   440C Stainless Steel   260   75   45,000   Lubricated   -40° to 240°   ABEC-1   6138K13   7.89

I used stainless on everything, all from McM-C

Shoulder bolts:
5/8"   10-24   3/8"   3/8"   3/16"   Passivated   70,000   1/8"   ASME B18.3   90298A539   2.60   2.21

Washers:
No. 10   0.203"   0.438"   0.025"-0.040"   Not Rated   __   100   92141A011   2.33

Nyloc Nuts:
10-32   3/8"   15/64"   220°   100   91831A411   6.27

NOT cheap!  I ordered enough bearings for all four jigs, 16 total, which were the major cost ($101).  Total order was $139. 

I used stainless because of the proximity to water.  With proper care ordinary steel could be used.  Given that I was going to be using them at farmers markets and wouldn't have time for "proper care", I opted for stainless. 

Rick

Quality is like buying oats.  If you want nice, clean, fresh oats, you must pay a fair price. However, if you can be satisfied with oats that have already been through the horse, that comes at a lower price.

tgbto

Hello, 

I'm in the process of trying to see if I can 3D-print these brilliant jigs, as I am no machinist, nor do I have easy access to one.

Regarding the bearings, I understand they will make the jig much more wear-resistant, but I was wondering, as I do not sharpen hundreds of knives a year : what if I 3d-printed the circular part protruding from the bottom as part of the plate ? The cost of reprinting compared to the cost of stainless bearings might make it worth a shot. Plus, I can always print the hole for the bearing axis, so I can mount some when the discs show significant wear...

Any thoughts ?

Thanks,

Nick.

RickKrung

#183
Quote from: tgbto on April 02, 2021, 10:14:59 AM
Hello, 

I'm in the process of trying to see if I can 3D-print these brilliant jigs, as I am no machinist, nor do I have easy access to one.

Regarding the bearings, I understand they will make the jig much more wear-resistant, but I was wondering, as I do not sharpen hundreds of knives a year : what if I 3d-printed the circular part protruding from the bottom as part of the plate ? The cost of reprinting compared to the cost of stainless bearings might make it worth a shot. Plus, I can always print the hole for the bearing axis, so I can mount some when the discs show significant wear...

Any thoughts ?

Thanks,

Nick.

I'm sure you could do that, but I think they would wear so quickly as to become useless until you did install bearings.  The manner of detecting the angle, that I use at least, involves rotating the stones/wheels until there is enough of them rotating due to contact with the grinding surface.  I suspect you could use the jig in a manner were you "sight" this contact without rotating the grinding wheels, so as to minimize wear of the contact points. 

Stainless steel bearings don't have to be expensive.  I just bought a set of 10, for $30 off Amazon.  I am certain they are not high quality, but for the purpose of these jigs, I am sure they would work.  The URL above is for bearings with an OD of 1/2", which is smaller than my design, but I also suspect one could find similarly inexpensive bearings with an OD of 5/8".  I would make sure to get "sealed" bearings rather than "open" is the only caveat. 

You should know, however, that I do not use these jigs any longer.  They work great, but I have found that setting the sharpening angles is much faster, more consistent/accurate and easier measuring the distance from the USB bar to the surface of the grinding or honing wheels.  I don't have time right now to search for the many threads where this is discussed, but if you haven't found them by the time I can search a little, I'll post some later.  It is one of the methods included in the TormekCalc2 spreadsheet and I know some of the calculator apps will provide this distance. 

Rick
Quality is like buying oats.  If you want nice, clean, fresh oats, you must pay a fair price. However, if you can be satisfied with oats that have already been through the horse, that comes at a lower price.

Dutchman

Quote from: RickKrung on April 02, 2021, 04:06:04 PM
... snip
I have found that setting the sharpening angles is much faster, more consistent/accurate and easier measuring the distance from the USB bar to the surface of the grinding or honing wheels.  I don't have time right now to search for the many threads where this is discussed ...
You can find the original approach in the link in my "signature". It is, imho, still the fastest and easiest method  ;)

RickKrung

Quote from: Dutchman on April 03, 2021, 10:59:10 AM
Quote from: RickKrung on April 02, 2021, 04:06:04 PM
... snip
I have found that setting the sharpening angles is much faster, more consistent/accurate and easier measuring the distance from the USB bar to the surface of the grinding or honing wheels.  I don't have time right now to search for the many threads where this is discussed ...

You can find the original approach in the link in my "signature". It is, imho, still the fastest and easiest method  ;)

I love it, Dutchman.  Thanks for "rooting" us at the beginning and thank you again for your awesome work and contribution. 

Rick
Quality is like buying oats.  If you want nice, clean, fresh oats, you must pay a fair price. However, if you can be satisfied with oats that have already been through the horse, that comes at a lower price.

Ken S

I was the first forum convert to Dutchman's Grinding Tables in 2013. At the time, I was sharpening chisels and plane blades. I had devised a method of standardizing set up. I saw the potential of using Dutchman's tables to standardize knife sharpening. His tables became the foundation of my kenjig.

Over the years, I have dabbled with the other programs. I have only good things to say about them; however, Dutchman's tables have remained my go to source. They give me repeatable sharpness. I have no need of interchangeable knives with matching bevels to the nth degree. I generally sharpen my knives to 15° edge bevels, and can adjust with the marker and microadjust on the rare occasions when I want something else.

Dutchman's tables have served me well.

Ken