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T2 Initial Review

Started by Ken S, September 26, 2017, 05:29:15 PM

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Ken S

Grepper,

Thank you for your thoughts. I will keep them in mind for future testing. For the present, I do not feel that I have fully tested the standard issue Tormek paper. I want to feel completely fluent with the standard issue machine and technique before pursuing other options.

Ken

Stickan

Grepper and Ken,
In the instruction video we actually have a tip of using tape if the user wants to protect his knifes. This is a bit time assuming so thats why we instead did the easy paper tip. What we found and was told was that a working chef don't care much about these scratches since they get them with a steel also.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AhA4uG9MUPU

Sincerely,
Stig







cbwx34

Quote from: grepper on October 04, 2017, 08:04:53 PM
Instead of using paper to prevent scratching, why not use slick tape?  Or electrical tape.  There are a LOT of different tape products that would probably work.

I've tried some tapes on other guides before, (not all the ones you've mentioned here), and found it not very effective at preventing scratching.  I don't think it would be practical to glue something into place... even with temporary adhesive.

The "paper sleeve" solution actually works pretty well at preventing scratches, and is easy to use.  The issues I mentioned earlier (trimming it and it sliding out), seemed to have been solved by slitting the top and folding it back, (and the sleeve can last for several knives this way).

Knife Sharpening Angle Calculators:
Calcapp Calculator-works on any platform (Just point your phone at the QR code)
or, a list of available Calculators

joshinthecity

Something I find interesting and have not seen discussed (from a commercial sharpening perspective)
I run a T8 from a van, and it's great. However I'm finding I'm working more and more freehand as the years progress..

One ongoing issue I have always had, is the need for my van to be virtually level, wherever I'm sharpening; to keep water from ending up all over the place. I may work up to 5-6 different sites in a day (residential and commercial)
A T2 could be an interesting prospect for a freehander potentially ?

Working freehand speeds up the per-knife process substantially, but not having to constantly be refilling, and levelling / dealing with water would be a HUGE advantage for us who work on the road..   assuming the wheel and motor are up to the job.

Any comments or thoughts appreciated.
Cheers,
Josh (Sydney Australia)

Ken S

Josh,

Are the wheel and motor (of the T2) up to the job? Based on my limited use of my T2 and knowing that Tormek has designed the T2 specifically for industrial use, I would say that the wheel is up to the job. (Don't forget the Tormek warranty.) The motor is certainly up to the job. It is the same motor that is used in the T4. I have intentionally stressed my T4 by running it all day at a woodworking show. I have used it with both CBN and Norton 3x wheels. It is a real turbo machine with these wheels. I need a rest before the T4 does. I wish Tormek would get away from that confusing thirty minute cycle nonsense. That is a carry over from the overheating problem with the all plastic housing of the T3. Tormek corrected the issue with the zinc top of the T4 (which is the same top on the T2). The zinc acts as a radiator. Based solely on my finger tests, the T4 does not get hot. Technophobes will point out that the T4 motor has a different industrial use classification as the larger T8 motor. I think it is a non isdue. Do you sharpen while driving?  :)

I have been pleasantly surprised with the low amount of metal dust with the T2.

While testing the T2, I needed to trim the bolster on a knife. Doing it freehand on the T2 was no problem.

For mobile work, I would suggest the T4 instead of the T2. The Bushcraft edition model package is a real bargain. Both of the diamond wheels, DWF-200 and DWC-200, 600 and 325 grit, are available as parts. So is the rubber honing wheel. They fit the T4 exactly and also (with an extra spacer washer) the T8 and other 250mm models.
All of the jigs and accessories for your T8 work with the T4. If you have been thinking about using an invertor, the smaller motor is 120 watts compared with 200 watts for the larger motor. I have never used an invertor, however, the lower wattage seems like an advantage.

You can make one of Herman's platforms, a definite aaid in freehand sharpening. The platform can be removed, allowing you to use the scissors jig for sharpening kitchen scissors.

My favorite benefit of the T4 is its compact size and weight (half the weight of the T8). I carry mine in an inexpensive single size bowling ball bag. It easily holds everything I might need for Tormek sharpening. I can grip it or use the shoulder strap. It is surprising and refreshingly comfortable to carry. Load it into the bag sitting on the boxed grinding wheel, or both wheels. Make sure to place the plastic spacer where the wheel is mounted. You are truly mobile.

Have you considered Making a simple plywood subbase for your T8? You could make shims to level it with a bubble level. A waterproof finish would protect it. It wouldn't need to be much larger than the T8 base. Used with the Tormek rubber work mat, or whatever you presently use, it would keep you level. Don't forget the turkey baster.

Must dash; it's time to get my grandchildren ready for school.

Keep us posted.

Ken

cbwx34

Quote from: joshinthecity on January 31, 2018, 06:09:19 AM
Something I find interesting and have not seen discussed (from a commercial sharpening perspective)
I run a T8 from a van, and it's great. However I'm finding I'm working more and more freehand as the years progress..

One ongoing issue I have always had, is the need for my van to be virtually level, wherever I'm sharpening; to keep water from ending up all over the place. I may work up to 5-6 different sites in a day (residential and commercial)
A T2 could be an interesting prospect for a freehander potentially ?

Working freehand speeds up the per-knife process substantially, but not having to constantly be refilling, and levelling / dealing with water would be a HUGE advantage for us who work on the road..   assuming the wheel and motor are up to the job.

Any comments or thoughts appreciated.
Cheers,
Josh (Sydney Australia)

I think a better option would be to look at alternative wheels for the T-8 (CBN, etc.)?  (Not having used them myself, I'll let someone else comment if that would work or not).  You might even be able to get a T-2 wheel and use it when needed, (although the CBN wheels come in the larger size).

A couple of other things to think about with the T-2:

  • It's very limited.  You can't use any jigs on it, the support bracket/bar for the angle guide is fixed and can't easily be removed (it appears you'd have to access it by removing parts inside the chassis).
  • The wheel that comes with it cuts slow compared to what you're used to on the T-8.  It's designed to maintain an edge.  There is a more coarse wheel available, but again the CBN alternatives might be worth a look.
  • The longevity of the diamond wheel hasn't been established to my knowledge.  I also would rather have a regular grindstone for major repairs.
On the plus side, if you were doing knives that just needed a touch-up... it would be a quick easy way to do it, with minimal setup... especially if you're used to sharpening freehand.

So maybe consider it in addition to, but not a replacement of, the T-8?  That would be my opinion.

As has been mentioned in other threads, once the wheel is "primed" for the day with water... it takes very little water in actual use.  It took me a while to figure this out (it was brought up before in threads where water running off the knives was an issue), so I've been experimenting with it, (because initially I couldn't tell a difference), but I've found now that once the wheel is primed, having just enough water to make contact with the wheel does the job, and keeps water runoff, etc. to a minimum.  Maybe worth a try?
Knife Sharpening Angle Calculators:
Calcapp Calculator-works on any platform (Just point your phone at the QR code)
or, a list of available Calculators