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Sharpening Fissler Chef's Knife

Started by Jan, December 10, 2016, 05:34:52 PM

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Jan

Recently I was sharpening an all-purpose Fissler Perfection Chef's Knife, 8 inches long. What I found interesting was that the composition of the steel was engraved on the blade. The other interesting feature was that its tang, running through the entire length of the handle, is elegantly twisted by 90-degree. The transition between the bolster and the handle is perfectly smooth with no cracks or edges.

I was sharpening the blade to an edge angle of 36° using the knife jig. Because the convex blade slightly tappers towards the edge it was necessary to correct the angle setting after turning the jig upside down. Two revolutions of the adjustable stop were necessary. The reason for the angle asymmetry was the wedge shaped blade which was not symmetrically mounted into the knife jig.  ;)

This knife made in Germany is elegant, it would be nice to have it in the kitchen, but the price is (for me) pretty high.  :)

Jan

SharpenADullWitt

My understanding of the regulations for German made knives is they have to be labeled, and German steel has specs they have to follow.  I see those specs on $6 commercial knives up to over $100 knives.  My experience (though limited) is the metal seems the same, but they don't always seem to go the same grain direction, and there are differences in angles they originally grind them at.
Favorite line, from a post here:
Quote from: Rob on February 24, 2013, 06:11:44 PM
8)

Yeah you know Tormek have reached sharpening nirvana when you get a prosthetic hand as part of the standard package :/)

Jan

#2
You may be correct, SADW. On the blade of another German made knife, brand Berndorf, not only the steel composition, but also the hardness data were engraved (HRC 55 +/- 2). I have not encountered this on Swiss or Scandinavian knives.

Jan

Jan

#3
Based on the BSSA (British Stainless Steel Association) data X50CrMoV15 is a high hardness martensitic stainless steel with approximate composition – 15% Cr, 0.7% Mo, 0.15% V, 0.50% C.

Jan

Jan

#4
The EN name X50CrMoV15 of this stainless steel grade is used for marketing purposes. BSSA considers this to be a rare and possibly a unique example. ;)

Jan

WolfY

Quote from: Jan on December 11, 2016, 05:10:06 PM
Based on the BSSA (British Stainless Steel Association) data X50CrMoV15 is a high hardness martensitic stainless steel with approximate composition – 15% Cr, 0.7% Mo, 0.15% V, 0.50% C.

Jan

Just today I sharpened a knife from a unknown Israeli brand that turned out to be a small local manufacturer that made a small series of knifes with this blade metal that they imported from Germany. As sharpener I notices the hardness and stiffness of the knife and liked it very much. It's characters reminder me of the Victorinox Fibros and some F-Dick knives. I don't know how it is on a long run comparison but it feels that it is as good as the mentioned knives. Will see it next time the client (new client) will need sharpening.
Giving an advice is easy.
Accepting an advice is good.
Knowing which advice is worth adopting and which not, is a virtue.

Jan

I have perceived the steel similarly, stiff and fairly hard.  :)

Jan